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ALAN BEAN Fine Art Editions
"Apollo 12 is Headed Home" by Alan Bean

Featured Work:
APOLLO 12 IS HEADED HOME
Greenwich Workshop
Fine Art SmallWorks™ Canvas:

limited to 125 s/n.
12"w x 9"h. $225





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"Apollo 12 is Headed Home" by Alan Bean 

APOLLO 12 IS HEADED HOME
by Alan Bean

Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and I are headed back home to planet Earth.  Boy, does that small blue and white ball look beautiful.  It is hard to believe three point six billion humans are scattered all over the surface of that sphere, but I know it is true.

One thing that was easy to believe, though, was that if our service module rocket engine did not perform as it was designed to do some thirteen minutes and twenty six seconds earlier, we were going to spend the brief rest of our lives circling this small, dusty and cratered Moon.

This was not something we spent any time thinking about during the earlier part of the mission, but it remained in the backs of our minds.  I remember that I thought about it more during our final revolution of the moon as we began preparation for our trans-earth injection (TEI) engine burn.

This is where we had to believe in the people we had worked with back on Earth.  We had to have confidence that the humans who had designed, built, assembled, and tested the service module rocket engine had done their jobs to perfection.  Dick would say, “I always had confidence the engine would start and burn for as long as we needed it to.”  For some reason I was more concerned with insuring we maintained the right burn attitude up to and during TEI.  We had verified this inertial attitude with mission control before we went behind the moon that last time, but as I looked out the window at that time, we were pointed at the center of the Moon.  I knew this was the way it had to be so that we would be aligned with our velocity vector at the planned ignition time, but it was a bit disconcerting.

Well, our service module propulsion system team had done their jobs perfectly.  As we came out from behind the moon that last time and could see our home some two hundred and thirty nine thousand miles distant, Pete would report to mission control, “Apollo 12 is headed home.”

One last memory:  as I looked out my window at the Moon, it looked like we were going straight up and away at tremendous speed; much faster than when we left the earth just eleven days ago.  I guess that is what one sees when leaving a small planet with only one-sixth the gravity of the earth.  I felt like we were going to be home safe in just a few days.

Own a unique and beautiful piece of lunar history, Alan Bean’s Apollo 12 is Headed Home, is painted by the first and only artist to visit another world. Each canvas is signed by the legendary Apollo 12 astronaut, moonwalker and artist ― each a work of art, each a historic document, each your own personal connection to traveling in space. Own a Fine Art Edition Canvas by astronaut and explorer Alan Bean and you will never look at the Moon the same way again.








Sizing & Pricing

Greenwich Workshop
Fine Art SmallWorks™ Canvas:

limited to 125 s/n.
12"w x 9"h. $225



"Apollo 12 is Headed Home" by Alan Bean

 

Previous Featured Work:

"Reaching for the Stars" by Alan Bean: A Textured Canvas Countersigned by 24 Astronauts

Previous Featured Work:

"First Flag" by Alan Bean

Alan Bean: Artist and Astronaut

Captain Alan Bean was the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12, the fourth man to walk on the moon and commander of Skylab 2. “I am fortunate enough to have seen sights no other artist ever has,” Bean says.

“I want my paintings to communicate an emotional experience in ways that photography cannot.”

Captain Bean creates his original works of art using a unique technique allowing the viewer to actually sense vestiges of the 20th century’s most dramatic accomplishments. Pressed into the canvas surfaces are Captain Bean’s authentic lunar boot “moonprints,” impressions from a core tube-bit used to collect soil samples and marks from a hammer used to drive the staff of the American flag into the moon’s surface. Moon dust, trapped on the patches on the outside of his suit, makes its way onto each original as well.

Each print and canvas is an historical record of the lunar experience, as each is signed by moonwalker Captain Alan Bean, with most countersigned by other moonwalkers and astronauts.This may be your only chance to own such a visionary and historic celebration of man’s greatest achievement. NASA was sometimes asked “Why not send an artist to the moon?” It turns out they did.

Biography

Alan Bean—Apollo XII astronaut, commander of Skylab II and artist—was born in 1932 in Wheeler, Texas. In 1950 he was selected for an NROTC scholarship at the University of Texas at Austin. In 1955, he was commissioned an ensign in the United States Navy.

Holder of eleven world records in space and astronautics, as well as numerous national and international honors, Alan Bean has had a most distinguished peacetime career. His awards include two NASA Distinguished Service Medals, the Yuri Gagarin Gold Medal and the Robert J. Collier Trophy. As part of the Apollo XII crew, he became the fourth of only twelve men ever to walk on the Moon. As the spacecraft commander of Skylab Mission II, he set a world record: 24,400,000 miles traveled during the 59-day flight. He has also launched himself successfully into a new career as an artist.

When he wasn’t flying, Bean always enjoyed painting as a hobby. Attending night classes at St. Mary’s College in Maryland in 1962, Alan experimented with landscapes. During training and between missions as a test pilot and astronaut, he continued private art lessons. On space voyages, his artist’s eye and talent enabled him to document impressions of the Moon and space to be preserved later on canvas. His art reflects the attention to detail of the aeronautical engineer, the respect for the unknown of the astronaut and the unabashed appreciation of a skilled painter.

The space program has seen unprecedented achievements and Bean realized that most of those who participated actively in this adventure would be gone in forty years. He knew that if any credible artistic impressions were to remain for future generations, he must paint them now. “My decision to resign from NASA in 1981 was based on the fact that I am fortunate enough to have seen sights no other artist ever has,” Bean said, “and I hope to communicate these experiences through art.”

Bean’s book Apollo: An Eyewitness Account which chronicles his first-person experience as an Apollo astronaut in words and paintings was received with critical and popular acclaim upon its publication in 1998.


Alan Bean samples the Ocean of Storms.

Is Anyone Out There?

A detail of Is Anyone Out There showing the lunar boot moonprints and core tube-bit imprint.

Alan Bean in 1981

Alan Bean in his studio

Alan Bean: Video
Watch this clip from the documentary Alan Bean: Artist.
Alan Bean, in his studio, discusses his art.







 

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