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Home> Catalogue > January 2011



The Survivors
by Simon Combes

A pair of eastern black rhinos make their way across the floor Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Crater in the late-afternoon African sun. Weighing in at one to one and a half tons and over 60” tall at the shoulder, this ill-tempered prehistoric throwback roams the savanna at will. Black rhino have a tendency to be less social than their cousins, the white rhino, but a mother and calf do remain quite bonded for up to four years.

At one time, over 30 species of rhino could be found around the planet. Now there are only five. Two, the black and the white, are found in East Africa, both have two horns. A rhino’s poor eyesight is augmented by a strong sense of smell and good hearing (and the above mentioned bad attitude). Left unharmed by man, a rhino can live 30 to 40 years in the wild.

Simon loved rhinoceros, but painted surprisingly few. "The Survivors" was a personal favorite of his.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 50 and numbered.
30 "w x 20"h.
$725

 



Arrogance
by Simon Combes

“I enjoy relating animals to human equivalents,” said artist Simon Combes. “I always think of cheetahs, for example, as very serious animals. A lion may grin and a leopard may leer or sneer but a cheetah would only frown. A cheetah might be a dedicated professional athlete whereas a lion would be an amateur rugby player.”

Simultaneously relaxed and vigilant, the cheetah at the center of "Arrogance" seems very somber indeed. This is, in part, attributable to the cheetah’s “tear marks,” black markings that run from the cheetah’s eyes to its mouth. The markings help block sunlight, as well as aid in hunting and seeing over long distances. They also make the cheetah appear incurably grave.

Simon Combes’ gorgeous rendering of one of nature’s fastest animals at rest was created as part of his “Great Cats of the World” series. "Arrogance" is a captivating portrait that will become the focal point of any room.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 100 and numbered.
30 "w x 20"h.
$725

 



First Light
by Simon Combes

“Cheetahs are enigmatic and perhaps the most intriguing of all the big cats to me,” says artist Simon Combes of the subject of "First Light." “My encounters with cheetahs have been like meeting a person who has poise, elegance, class, fleeting moments of warmth and yet tantalizingly aloof. The challenge of painting cheetahs is two-fold: firstly, the chest is so pronounced in comparison to the head that in certain positions the animal can look positively grotesque. Secondly, I am often stumped at portraying the cat’s mood . . . what is it thinking behind that mask of haughty distain? So serious, so intent, so reserved, does this animal ever relax and have fun?

This painting was as much an indulgence in design as it was an attempt to capture that magical, early-morning, golden mistiness surrounding the surreal silhouettes of distant arcadia trees. I loved the elegant, s-shaped line from the cheetah’s nose to the tip of its tail.”

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 and numbered.
14 "w x 18"h.
$395

 



An African Experience
by Simon Combes

Artist, adventurer and conservationist Simon Combes called Africa home. His art portrays the grace, power and mystery of the wild with an exacting technique and attention to detail. Best known for his stunning images of African landscapes and wildlife, Combes’ paintings would be mistaken for photographs, except for life and warmth no Nikon can capture. In "An African Experience," Simon’s focus is on the pride of the Serengeti. “Little outcrops of rock stand out like islands in the grassy sea of the Serengeti,” Simon said. “Formed millions of years ago during the cataclysmic upheavals and volcanic eruptions of Africa's birth, these rock groups form fantastic shapes. For Serengeti lions, rock garden oases are more than watering holes. They provide lairs where cubs can be born, and havens to escape the heat of the day. They are also vantage points from which lions can watch the parade of life go by.

MasterWork™
Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 100 and numbered.
32"w x 40"h.
$975

 



Midday Siesta
by Simon Combes

Lions are not preyed upon by any other animal which probably explains their arrogance and any disregard for other species. Apparently, this also explains why they have no stripes or spots — no need for camouflage — although they do have spots when they are young. Resting during the day, they display strong family ties with much mutual rubbing, licking and body contact. Their uninterrupted life of sleeping, eating and breeding would suggest a population explosion but the illusion of peaceful cooperation disappears a soon as food is available. Then, survival of the fittest is the maxim. Recent apparent soul-mates spit and snarl and swipe at each other and any lion not in top condition will go hungry without pricking the conscience of its fellow.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 and numbered.
28 "w x 19"h.
$625

 



Sentinels
by Simon Combes

"The giraffe is one of the world's most extraordinary creatures. Because of their height and exceptional eyesight, they serve as lookouts for the rest of the herd and can eat leaves that are beyond the reach of almost any other animal. They are a peace-loving breed, although they are well able to defend themselves. Any big cat who tries to attack them will think twice before attempting it again."

Untouched by the callous hand of man, the graceful silhouette of a classic acacia tree and the serene elegance of the world's tallest mammal provide the perfect antidote for this increasingly crowded, stressed and frenetic world.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Paper:
limited to 550 s/n.
12 1/2"w x 19 5/8"h.
$125

 



In His Prime
by Simon Combes

A young lion leads his family from a muted, shadowy landscape onto the sunny plain. As the lionesses catch up, he stands at attention and scans the horizon for signs of trouble. A dry, hot breeze ruffles his mane but still the young lion stands in the dry grass, unblinking, unmoved and utterly "In His Prime."

Artist Simon Combes spent the majority of his adult life painting wildlife in his homeland, Africa. His dynamic animal portraits and sweeping landscapes earned him honors from The Society of Animal Artists, the Pacific Rim Wildlife Art Show and the Florida Wildlife Expo. In the early 1990s, Combes set out to paint a series of the world's largest cats (his favorite subject) for The Greenwich Workshop, a project which eventually resulted in the trade book "Great Cats: Stories and Art from a World Traveller" and a collector's portfolio of limited edition prints.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 150 and numbered.
25 "w x 30"h.
$895

 


 

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