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Howard Terpning - Crows in the Yellowstone -  LIMITED EDITION CANVAS Published by the Greenwich Workshop


          Crows in the Yellowstone
by Howard Terpning

$895.00

LIMITED EDITION CANVAS
Limited Edition of: 125
Image Size: 25"w x 35"h.
Published: September 2015


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Government propaganda helped spread the rumor that the hot springs and geysers of Yellowstone kept “superstitious” Indians, who were “afraid of evil spirits,” away from this mystical and fertile land. Declared a national park in 1872, Yellowstone was the scene of a set of hostile encounters between Chief Joseph’s fleeing Nez Perce and visiting tourists in 1877. The conflict created a public relations nightmare for the fledgling park service. The rumor, which persists today, was created and perpetuated in order to counteract the subsequent bad press and to draw tourists back to the park.

There is a world of difference between recognizing the sacred nature, mystery and power of a place and being afraid of it. The Crow respected and revered what they called “land of the burning ground” or “land of vapors.” Although they lived primarily in the region to the east of what became Yellowstone National Park, the Crow camped and hunted throughout the region.

The Crow were expert horsemen. They dubbed the horse "Ichilay," meaning “to search with,” perhaps referring to the search for enemies and game. While other Plains tribes used the travois for hauling, the Crow, from children to elders, all rode and used packhorses that enabled them to travel fast no matter what the terrain. The Crow were regarded as premier horse thieves. One of the four military tests for an aspiring Crow warrior was to sneak into an enemy camp at night, capture a fine horse and bring it back successfully.

It was then almost impossible to catch the Crow, especially if they took refuge behind the Absaroka Range in what is now Yellowstone.




Howard Terpning
Quite simply, Howard Terpning is one of the most lauded painters of Western art. His awards are so numerous and he is honored with them so often, that to list them would require changing the count every few months. To name three would be to cite the highest prizes awarded to Western art: countless awards from the Cowboy Artists of America, the Hubbard Art Award for Excellence, the National Academy of Western Art’s Prix de West and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Autry National Center. Why such praise? Passion, compassion, devotion and respect for his subject matter, extraordinary talent in palette and brushstroke, an exceptional ability to evoke emotion both in his paintings and from those viewing them — all this and more has made Terpning the "Storyteller of the Native American." Born in Illinois and educated at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and the American Academy of Art, he first gained attention with his captivating advertising and story illustrations. Film fans praised his movie posters for such classics as The Sound of Music, Dr. Zhivago and the re-issue of Gone with the Wind. But his love of the West and Native American traditions saw his transition to fine art. Terpning is an Emeritus member of the Cowboy Artists of America, active for 22 years, during which time he was presented with a total of 41 awards. His book, The Art of Howard Terpning won the Wrangler "Outstanding Art Book" award from the National Cowboy Hall of Fame. Terpning was recently honored with a one-man show at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis, Indiana featuring 30 of the artist’s most distinguished works where he was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award. This career milestone was further celebrated with the publication of Spirit of the Plains People (2001, Greenwich Workshop Press). Terpning is the recipient of the Autry National Center, 2005 Masters of the American West Thomas Moran Memorial Award, given in recognition of exceptional artistic merit for painting.

 

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