All Images ©Respective Artists ©The Greenwich Workshop®, Inc.




Your Name is Safe in My Mouth

by Cassandra Barney

The rose has been used for centuries to convey messages without words. The Latin expression sub rosa (literally “under the rose”) means something told in secret, thus the rose has long been a symbol of confidentiality.

The woman here sits sub rosa. Your Name is Safe in My Mouth means that she will never speak badly of you. This means more than simply your-secrets-are-her-secrets. This painting is about discovering the trust in love because having trust in a partner is invaluable. Nothing that will hurt the ones you love should come from your mouth. It is one way of honoring the people that you care about.

The flower she holds is the lily of the valley.  Some think this flower is referred to in Song of Songs: 2.1 ("…a lily among thorns"), concerning the idea that the true path is able to thrive in even the harshest environment.  This flower also carries with it the sentiment, "You will find happiness."  In either case, this woman’s relationship will thrive because she chooses to base it on honor and trust.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:

limited to 75 s/n.
9"w x 23"h.
$325
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Outside the Box

by James C. Christensen

This hunchback “Everyman” of James C. Christensen’s symbology is not only thinking outside the box, he is outside of his box. He’s arrived, and if he had any trouble getting here, it’s behind him now. It’s like getting up very early in the morning, before everyone else, and taking that quiet time to reflect. It’s a perfect moment, sitting on the checkered game board of life, and contemplating a cloudless future. In a couple of hours he may be joined by others, or maybe not, but for now the sky’s the limit, the air smells great, and the possibilities are endless.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 325 s/n.
30"w x 18"h.
$595
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The Creche

by Guy Combes

The Aberdare National Park in Kenya, which ranges from 9 to 15,000 feet in elevation, is an enchanted island of montane forest on the edge of the Rift Valley. The elephants that inhabit this Eden are accustomed to their privacy since there is so much cover to protect them from the few people that visit the park. My inspiration for
The Creche came from a recent visit. As I approached the herd, these three females immediately huddled around their young to protect them. The Aberdare National Park is a very special place for my own family, too. It is where we regularly gather to pay our respects to my grandparents, my uncle and my father, so the family theme seemed particularly appropriate to me.

MasterWork™
Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:

limited to 15 s/n.
40"w x 30"h (unstretched).
$1200
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Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 50 s/n.
28"w x 21"h.
$550
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Spring Break

by Bev Doolittle®

It’s hard work being a foal. First off, after you are born, you don’t even get a meal until you stand. By the way, those legs you have to stand on can be nearly 90% the size of those on a full grown horse. You need those big legs because every day they have to support the additional two to three pounds you’ve grown.

Then, of course, one has play.

It’s a big beautiful world you’ve been born into and, heck, they don’t call it “horsin’ around” for nothing. Somebody has to do it. Spring is in the air. There are the other colts and fillies to impress, food to eat, mares to trot beside, more food, dirt to roll in, maybe a snack, bugs everywhere, more food and so on.

Every now and then it does one good to drop down into the closest patch of green grass and spring blossoms and grab a little siesta. After all, it’s hard work being a foal

Bev Doolittle’s Spring Break is her first Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Edition Giclee on Paper released by the Greenwich Workshop. As a SmallWork™, it’s accessible size and price make it the perfect Valentine’s gift for that special Doolittle collector or horse lover.

Bring a little spring in your life this winter and call your Authorized Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Dealer today!

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art SmallWorks™ Giclée on Paper:
limited to 1500 s/n.
10"w x 8"h.
$195
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Scenic View

by Steve Hanks

She’s at the edge of a low wall with no clear path ahead but her eyes are drawn to the sweep of white foam from the crashing waves in the cove below. From there her dreams can soar. The turn of her head contributes to the painting’s expression of solitude and yet we share her view. Everything about this woman says “confidence” and the beautiful composition of physical and geographic curves presents an elegant portrait for any room in the house. Scenic View is published as a giclée on paper, virtually identical to the watercolor of the original painting.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée on Paper:
limited to 75 s/n.
18 1/2"w x 25 1/4"h.
$495
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Idle Hours

by Bonnie Marris

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 25 s/n.
32"w x 24"h.
$795
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Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 125 s/n.
20"w x 15"h.
$395
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Summit Sanctuary

by Daniel Smith

Collectors of Daniel Smith’s Fine Art Editions are already familiar with his astonishing versatility. This artist is not gathering moss painting the same one or two species. He is equally at home painting a bear in the water as he is a thundering herd of buffalo or a mountain lion poised to leap. The subject of Summit Sanctuary is the Dall sheep in a perfect alpine landscape that shows the high elevation these mountaineers prefer. The Dall sheep inhabit the subarctic mountain ranges of Alaska and the Canadian northwest and their adaptation to this rugged high country environment has ensured their survival for thousands of years. Storm clouds may gather on the ridge top but this group of three relaxes in a spot of sun, taking in what must be an expansive view below.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 s/n.
34"w x 17"h.
$695
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The Gardener

by Morgan Weistling

Morgan Weistling’s contemporary impressionism describes the innocence and wonder of a timeless America, as well as the beauty of everyday moments. Weistling is inspired by country life and particularly the lives of children with their irrepressible urge to explore. Morgan says of his model “Her name is Jessica and I discovered her while she attended a Christmas play. As soon as I saw her, painting ideas began to come to me. I imagined her coming in from her grandmother’s garden with her newly picked prizes.”

In the tradition of the artist’s irresistible recent releases Spilled Milk and Juicy Peach, The Gardener portrays the magical innocence of a darling garden helper, in her straw hat and crisp white apron, from a not-too-distant rural American past. She holds her beets tentatively, perhaps because of her white apron! Who wouldn’t want this little gardener’s help?

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 s/n.
16"w x 26"h.
$595
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Crow Indian with Peace Pipe

by James Bama

“I painted a lot of old time Westerners―cowboys, Indians, outfitters―people with wrinkles. But I painted them as people. That they were Westerners was incidental. If I had moved to New England as I first intended, I would have painted wrinkled fisherman.”

James Bama met Henry Bright Wings during a medicine ceremony performed in the tepee of a Crow medicine man in Wyola, Montana. He was then 68. Bama liked his classic face, which he thought would have been appropriate on a buffalo nickel. When Bright Wings visited Old Trail Town in Cody, Wyoming several years later, Bama dressed him in historical costume including a pre-1900 headdress and a very old buffalo robe from the Old Trail Town Museum in Cody.

In earlier times the right to wear a headdress had to be earned, usually in battle. Today even women and children sometimes wear a showy nontraditional war bonnet for pow-wow dance parades and celebrations. Many men feel that their age is entitlement enough, but others will not wear a headdress because they do not consider it their proper. Bama met a Pine Ridge Reservation Indian who would not pose in a headdress even though he was 45 years old and certainly looked venerable enough.

During the Indian Wars of the post-Civil War years, Bright Wings’ people, the Crows, frequently allied themselves with the military against such traditional enemies as the Sioux and the Cheyenne. Crow scouts rode to their deaths with Custer.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:

limited to 75 s/n.
21"w x 17"h.
$595
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The Harvest

by June Carey

With
The Harvest, artist June Carey returns to the location of her sell-out fine art edition Lost in a View. Inspired by the hills surrounding Florence and the Castello di Verrazzano Chianti region, the painting marks the warm fall days of the Tuscan grape harvest in late September and early October. Working farmers of all ages, men and women wearing their long aprons, gather at the edge of the field, laughing, talking and sometimes singing. They then go out with great purpose and energy, carrying their red buckets through the seasoned vines which are heavy with deep blue clusters of grapes. Cypress trees surround the ancient walls of the buildings that mark the home of wine cellars since the twelfth century.

“I bought one of the red grape harvest buckets to use as a prop in the paintings. At the vineyard, the workers eyed my camera with suspicion and curiosity. I held it up and yelled ‘Artista di California. E' bello!’ They laughed among themselves and went back to the harvest.”

MasterWork™
Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 35 s/n.
48"w x 36"h (unstretched).
$1500

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Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 s/n.
36"w x 24"h.
$750

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In Pursuit of the White Buffalo

by Frank C. McCarthy

Sioux hunters pursue a rare white buffalo, its robe considered “big medicine” to be passed reverently from generation to generation and could command the price of 10 to 15 horses. Estimates based on hide trader’s records indicate that a white bison occurred only once in every five million animals. Plains Indians trained their best horses to hunt buffalo. But the white buffalo was elusive, often seeming to be sheltered by the rest of the herd as if the others had an instinctive sense that its color made it somehow special. These Sioux hunters may be close but the outcome is far from certain.

"My artistic approach is not to do a historical document. It is more a portrayal of an event or scene that happened many times in many places in the West. I give the scene the greatest possible visual impact and accurate detail.”

Anniversary Edition™
Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 and numbered.
34"w x 20"h.
$795

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New Sound in an Ancient Canyon

by William S. Phillips

“Pack mules and motors are sounds that have been heard in the Grand Canyon for only a blink of the geologic eye.”
Phillips’ passion for aviation is second only to his infatuation with the American experience and the impact that the land, its people, its history and its values have upon one another. This is what he calls The American Landscape, paintings about a time, a place and the course of American events.

The Grand Canyon is the iconic American landscape. For millennia, the only sounds heard in the Canyon were those of the elements and all things wild. As man arrived the sounds of early domestication could, only faintly, be heard. By the late 1800s, outfits such as Wellington Starky’s Diamond Bar Ranch heralded the news that cattle was king, even in the Grand Canyon. Mining, rail and even the automobile would soon follow.

In 1919, man took to the skies over the Canyon for the first time. A mere nine years later, Grand Canyon Airlines was taking tourists on scenic flights in Ford Tri-Motors such as this one, bouncing the drone of radial engines from ancient rim to ancient rim. Flights such as this confirmed that as yet another era neared its end in the Canyon, a new one had begun--as the crown jewel of The American Landscape.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 s/n.
30"w x 22"h.
$725

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Found on the Field of Battle

by Howard Terpning®

This is another tight grouping of three men similar to The Long Shot, with approximately the same scale of the figures in relation to the surrounding area. This type of composition can tell a story very well and the viewer can see the story immediately. These three Cheyenne warriors have been in a battle with the cavalry and in the aftermath of the conflict they were able to find trophies on the ground that they prized highly. One man wears a cavalry hat, another has found a dispatch case which will no doubt be converted into something more to his liking, and the third man has a bugle, which will give him bragging rights. Finding trophies on the field of battle is something that has gone on since battles were fought and this is my interpretation of such an experience.

MasterWork™
Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 300 s/n.
38"w x 30"h.
$1250

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